Electric Poetry – Linda Nemec Foster

by Olive, 88.1FM WYCE, Grand Rapids Community Media Center

Topics: linda nemec foster, electric poetry, olive
Linda Nemec Foster on Electric Poetry with Olive on 88.1FM WYCE.org

Originally Published by Electric Poetry, click here to view article.

Polish-American Writers Reading at the Polish Museum of America

On February 12, 2009, The Polish Museum of America hosted a reading by five Polish American writers: Anthony Bukoski, Linda Nemec Foster, John Minczeski, Leslie Pietrzyk, and me.

The event was a powerful emotional experience for all of us. Speaking for myself, I know that it’s not often that I have the opportunity to read to an audience of people who share my Polish heritage, and when I do such readings, I always feel a strong connection that is hard to explain. It’s a connection that goes beyond words (whether Polish or English), beyond present circumstances, and beyond borders.

Shortly after the reading, Maria Ciesla, the President of The Polish Museum of America, sent me a note that conveys what, I believe, both the readers and the audience felt that night:

Thank you so much for your successful efforts, and please convey my sincere thanks to Linda, Leslie, John, and Anthony. Guests present are still commenting to me about the uniqueness and artistic fullness of the evening. This was a new and magical event for the PMA, and I can assure you it will not be the last. Despite my being transfixed, I glanced around the Hall and observed the same.

To me personally, your writings parallel so much of my own experience, even though our family did not remain in Chicago’s Polonia. Driving home, I blessed and thanked my parents even more than in the past!

_______________________________

To find out more about the readers who read at the Polish Museum, please double click on their names:

Anthony Bukoski has published five story collections, four with Southern Methodist University Press, including North of the Port and Time Between Trains. Holy Cow! Press recently reissued his first book, Twelve Below Zero, in a new and expanded edition. A Christopher Isherwood Foundation fellowship winner, Bukoski teaches English at the University of Wisconsin-Superior.

Linda Nemec Foster is the author of eight collections of poetry including Amber Necklace from Gdansk (LSU Press), Listen to the Landscape (Eerdmans Publishing), Ten Songs from Bulgaria (Cervena Barva Press). She has received honors from the Academy of American Poets, the National Writer’s Voice, and the Polish American Historical Association. She is the founder of the Contemporary Writers Series at Aquinas College and currently is a member of the Series’ programming committee.

John Guzlowski writes poems about his family’s experiences in the Nazi concentration camps. His most recent books are Lightning and Ashes and the Pulitzer-nominated Third Winter of War: Buchenwald. His unpublished novel about German soldiers on the Eastern Front has recently been short-listed for the Bakeless Literary Award.

John Minczeski’s books of poetry include Letter to Serafin (Akron University Press), November (Finishing Line Press), Circle Routes (Akron University Press), Gravity (Texas Tech). He’s the winner of the Akron Poetry Prize, a Bush Fellowship, and an NEA fellowship among other prizes. He freelances as a poet in the schools and does occasional adjunct work.

Leslie Pietrzyk is the author of two novels: Pears on a Willow Tree (Avon Books) and A Year and a Day (William Morrow). She teaches at Johns Hopkins and has received fellowships from the Bread Loaf and the Sewanee Writers’ Conferences. She is currently writing a novel about Polish immigrants in Chicago.

 

Originally Published by Writing Polish Diaspora, click here to view article.

“The Dream of Trees” by Dianne Carroll Burdick & Linda Nemec Foster

The Dream of Trees

by Dianne Carroll Burdick & Linda Nemec Foster

 

To walk like the scarves
Of clouds, to abandon land
And never return

 

Originally Published by Rattle, click here to view article.

DIANNE CARROLL BURDICK: “I photographed all the images with black & white film and printed all images on fiber-base black & white paper. When the print is dry, I treat the paper with an oil-base solvent and color the image with colored pencils. ‘Dream of Trees’ was photographed at Moose Lake, Maine, around 7 a.m. My husband, Rob, and I were traveling from Cape Cod, Massachusetts, back home to Grand Rapids, Michigan. This view was too beautiful not to stop.”

LINDA NEMEC FOSTER: “Throughout my writing career, I have had a deep interest in collaborating with others. In 1998 Dianne Carroll Burdick asked me to write poems in response to her photography for a collaborative art/poetry exhibit called ‘The Good Earth.’ I composed haiku—the traditional form created by Japanese poets over 500 years ago. Then, as now, haiku were written in response to the natural world: the human reaction to the landscape that we are a part of, yet separate from. Ultimately, this project was not only about the landscapes of images and words, but about ourselves: how each of us reflects the universe that the world contains.”

 

“Playground” by Dianne Carroll Burdick & Linda Nemec Foster

DIANNE CARROLL BURDICK: “I photographed all the images with black & white film and printed all images on fiber-base black & white paper. When the print is dry, I treat the paper with an oil-base solvent and color the image with colored pencils. ‘Playground’ was photographed at my dad’s ranch in Ukiah, California. Strangely enough, Ukiah spelled backwards is haiku. My dad, Bruce Carroll, had 200 acres called Round Mountain, and when I would visit, I would always twirl near the spot that this photograph was taken, to enjoy the vast beauty of the land.”

LINDA NEMEC FOSTER: “Throughout my writing career, I have had a deep interest in collaborating with others. In 1998 Dianne Carroll Burdick asked me to write poems in response to her photography for a collaborative art/poetry exhibit called ‘The Good Earth.’ I composed haiku—the traditional form created by Japanese poets over 500 years ago. Then, as now, haiku were written in response to the natural world: the human reaction to the landscape that we are a part of, yet separate from. Ultimately, this project was not only about the landscapes of images and words, but about ourselves: how each of us reflects the universe that the world contains.”


PLAYGROUND

She wants to run, twirl
Follow the path all the way
To her past: those trees

Originally Published by Rattle, click here to view article.

Calvin College Festival of Faith and Writing

In these sessions we feature several authors who are new to the Festival of Faith and Writing. A Reading by Barbara Crooker and Linda Nemec Foster.

Order the CD of Steve Talaga’s music that was inspired by “Contemplating the Heavens”

This is music that crosses boundaries. Classical music, jazz, funk, free improvisation. These pieces were written as a companion to a book of poems by Linda Nemec Foster about the planets and other celestial bodies.
Genre: Jazz: Traditional Jazz Combo
Release Date: 2006

Linda Nemec Foster’s debut as first Poet Laureate of Grand Rapids, MI

Linda Nemec Foster delivers her first speech as the first Poet Laureate of Grand Rapids at the unveiling of the newly renovated Grand Rapids Public Library. April 21, 2003

Originally Published by PoetLaureateDebut, click here to view.

About the Planet Walk

The walk begins at the north west corner of Albertus Hall. From this starting point, you will be able to see the first four planets on the walk. The first four planets are relatively closely spaced with the third representing Earth. These planets are just the beginning of your tour and we hope that you continue with the walk by visiting all of the planets throughout campus!

The Foster Planet Walk was funded by a generous grant from Dr. Anthony and Linda Foster, both graduates of Aquinas College, whose love of science and the arts made this educational attraction a reality.

The Earth from Space*
You look like a total stranger.
No hint of the familiar ground
beneath our feet, but a gauze-wrapped sapphire
suspended in heavy black and disbelief.
That’s what they must have seen:
those men on the moon who only dreamed you
on the horizon, over their shoulders. Forgetting
for one long moment the difference between
night and day, water and air, home and here.
– Linda Nemec Foster

Biographical Note
Tony and Linda (Nemec) Foster embody a marriage of art and science. Both graduates of Aquinas, they met in college during the late ’60s. Tony went on to medical school at Wayne State University and is currently a general surgeon in practice in Grand Rapids. He is also on the teaching staff of Butterworth Hospital. Linda received her Master in Fine Arts from Goddard College in Vermont. She is an established poet and writer whose work has been published in numerous journals and literary magazines both regionally and nationally. Linda is also a teacher, conducting poetry workshops for the Michigan Council for the Arts and Cultural Affairs. The Fosters live in Grand Rapids with their children, Brian and Ellen.

*Copyrighted © 1995 by Linda Nemec Foster. This poem was originally published in The Artful Dodge, Fall, 1995. All rights reserved. The poem cannot be used in any way without the consent of the author.

Originally Published by Aquinas College, click here to view article.